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How Ulcerative Colitis Affects Your Risk for Developing Colorectal Cancer

Did you know there’s a significant link between ulcerative colitis (UC) and colorectal cancer? Ulcerative colitis patients have a six times greater risk of developing colorectal cancer than those of average risk. But, that being said, only about 5% of people with severe ulcerative colitis will end up developing this type of cancer. Plus, there are ways you can lower your risk.

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Categories: Colorectal Cancer, Gastrointestinal Cancers

Can You Detect Pancreatic Cancer in Its Early Stages?

Early detection of just about any type of cancer will make treatment a lot easier. This is especially true with pancreatic cancer. If detected early, in stage 1, oncologists will have more treatment options than when it’s found in later stages and has moved to other areas of the body.

The problem is, early detection can be hard because there aren’t a lot of obvious signs that pancreatic cancer has developed. Because of this, many pancreatic cancer patients have a late-stage disease by the time it’s found. Thankfully new pancreatic cancer treatments will soon be more widely available. Several cancer research studies – including some available in the Portland area – are underway to find better treatment options. This includes targeted therapies and immunotherapies that have the potential to increase survival rates. 

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Categories: Gastrointestinal Cancers

Does Acid Reflux Cause GI Cancer?

The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is in charge of tightening the esophagus after food is passed into the stomach. When the LES is weak, the acid from your stomach washes up into the lower part of your esophagus causing a burning sensation. This is acid reflux. But does acid reflux have a connection to stomach or esophageal cancer?

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Categories: Gastrointestinal Cancers

Is Heartburn an Indication of Cancer?

It's impossible to imagine just how bad heartburn really is until you've actually experienced it firsthand. It can be so painful that people go to the emergency room because they're afraid they're having a heart attack. Some people struggle with heartburn nearly every day, while others only experience it once in a great while. It's estimated that heartburn strikes 15 million Americans daily. The number one concern most people after they've finally gotten some relief from the pain is what was the cause of the heartburn.

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Categories: Cancer Risk, Gastrointestinal Cancers, Oral, Head and Neck Cancer

13 Things That You Should Know About Liver Cancer

October is liver cancer awareness month. Which makes this the perfect time to look at risk factors for liver cancer. Liver cancer is often eclipsed by breast cancer in the public eye, but it's still important to know what can cause it and if you can possibly avoid some of the risk factors.

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Categories: Gastrointestinal Cancers, Liver Cancer

When Should You Start Colon Cancer Screenings?

Did you know that the screening age for colorectal cancer was lowered to 45?

Based on recent research, the American Cancer Society (ACS) lowered the recommended age to begin colon cancer screening from 50 to 45. The five-year difference is important to note when it comes to managing your health care. The ACS predicts that in 2019 more than 23,000 Oregonians will receive a diagnosis of colon cancer. Learning more about the screening process is one step a patient can take in preventing and fighting this dreaded disease.

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Categories: Cancer Prevention, Cancer Screening, Colorectal Cancer, Gastrointestinal Cancers

A Simple Test Could Reveal if You’re at High Risk for Developing Colon Cancer

Cancer researchers from Johns Hopkins have concluded that some patients may develop colon cancer due to two specific digestive bacterias that form a film on the colon.

The two bacteria the doctors found working together to heighten cancer are known as Bacteroides fragilis and Escherichia coli (or E. coli). The B. fragilis strain, called ETBF, appears to cause inflammation in the colon, while the E. coli strain causes DNA mutations. 

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Categories: Cancer Prevention, Cancer Risk, Cancer Screening, Colorectal Cancer, Gastrointestinal Cancers